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The White House Prahran / Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Arch…

first_imgThe White House Prahran / Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH ArchitectsSave this projectSaveThe White House Prahran / Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Architects “COPY” Save this picture!© John Gollings+ 26 Share CopyAbout this officeNervegna Reed ArchitectureOfficeFollowPH ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHousesAustraliaPublished on March 29, 2011Cite: “The White House Prahran / Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Architects” 29 Mar 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogFaucetshansgroheKitchen MixersGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Classic™ SeriesPlumbingSanifloMacerator – Saniaccess®3WoodBruagAcoustic Panels with LEDMetallicsSculptformClick-on Battens in Ivanhoe ApartmentsSkylightsVELUX CommercialLonglight 5-30° – Modular SkylightsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteLove TilesPorcelain Tiles – SplashAluminium CompositesMetawellAluminum Panels for Interior DesignMetal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelEducationalLamitechChalk boardCarpetsCarpet ConceptCarpet – Eco IquMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/122704/the-white-house-prahran-nervegna-reed-architecture-ph-architects Clipboard Projects ArchDaily Houses Architects: Nervegna Reed Architecture, PH Architects Area Area of this architecture projectcenter_img The White House Prahran / Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Architects Photographs:  John GollingsText description provided by the architects. The client, an Art Gallery director, asked for a contemporary home on a narrow inner city allotment. The house was to have two bedrooms plus an extra study that could be used for visiting artists to stay in, and was also to include a private subterranean gallery.The house extends over 3 levels; the entry is on the middle, ground level, where all the living spaces flow around a courtyard, a sliced circle, a hint of a possible larger courtyard in an expanded field of scattered architectural objects and events. The placement of objects on this level works much like a layout of a pinball machine, with each surface hinting at possible routes that one could take through the house, sometimes encouraging a certain movement, sometimes not. The front study is for visiting artists and has an adjoining bathroom. Downstairs is a basement gallery, indirectly lit from the north front garden via a concrete light shaft / skylight which also doubles as a seat or sculpture podium.Save this picture!© John GollingsRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareApavisaSlabs – ConcretePanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsFretwork Facade PanelWoodEGGERTimberThe house works a bit like a Rorschach test, enabling people to read into it what they like, whether it be virtual images of a “?”, or a number “2” in the front facade, or other architectural images throughout the spaces, hidden, like vague reflections. The house in some ways became an experiment in treading the fine line between representational imagery and ‘pure’ abstract form. No matter how abstract our forms may be, the free association of the inhabitants will create new, varied and ever changing meanings and images.Save this picture!© John GollingsProject gallerySee allShow less2011 Pritzker Prize: Eduardo Souto de MouraArticlesSports Canopy / GS-CAArticles Share Area:  364 m² Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/122704/the-white-house-prahran-nervegna-reed-architecture-ph-architects Clipboard “COPY” CopyHouses•Australia Australialast_img read more

Compton Hospice tells Ruth Badger “You’re hired

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Celebrity Recruitment / people Compton Hospice tells Ruth Badger “You’re hired Ruth Badger is set to become an ambassador for Wolverhampton’s Compton Hospice. Ruth shot to stardom as the clear favourite in The Apprentice before narrowly missing out to Michelle Dewberry.Now Wolverhampton-born Ruth is lending her support to the hospice and has pledged to do all she can to boost its funding by appealing directly to businesses to put their hands in their pockets. Ruth’s interest in the specially-created role of ambassador was sparked by experiencing first-hand the care given to family members. Advertisement Howard Lake | 14 June 2006 | Newscenter_img  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Ruth will assist with developing fundraising and awareness campaigns for the organisation and is due to take part in planned sponsored activities, including abseiling and firewalking. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Rapidata introduces first event fundraising app to run entirely within Facebook

first_imgRapidata Services Plc has launched the Friendship Powered Fundraising™ App for Facebook to the UK charity market. It is “the first ever event fundraising app that runs entirely within Facebook”. The app has been created by Rapidata’s technology partner Artez Interactive, based in Canada. The Friendship Powered Fundraising (FPF) App is designed to help people use Facebook to make the most of their network of friends to help them fundraise in their sponsored event, whether that is a walk, run, cycle or other chalenge event.  Once registered for an event supporters can share information about fundraising targets, accept donation payments, track progress and post updates and pictures about the events on their Facebook timeline. Unlike other ways of using Facebook for fundraising, they can do all this without having to leave Facebook to visit another site. CEO and Chairman of Artez Interactive, James Appleyard added: “Our app is also first to be integrated across multiple channels, and it works perfectly on your mobile, tablet or desktop device.” Scott Gray, Managing Director of [url=http://www.rapidataservices.com]Rapidata[/url] commented: “This year there are 30.6 million Facebook users in the UK, and with an equal gender split and an age demographic spanning teenagers to pensioners (14 million over forty), the platform lends itself to Friendship Powered Fundraising”. http://rapidataservices.com/artez/rapidata-introduces-unique-friendship-powered-fundraising-app-for-facebook/ About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: app Digital Events Facebook Rapidata Services plc  79 total views,  3 views today Advertisement Rapidata introduces first event fundraising app to run entirely within Facebookcenter_img Howard Lake | 18 October 2012 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  80 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Bus drivers’ leader on Trump’s attacks on Haitians

first_imgWW correspondent Sam Ordóñez interviewed André François, president of the United Steelworkers, Local 8751, which represents the Boston and Randolph School bus drivers.In December, the Department of Homeland Security ended temporary protected status (TPS) for 59,000 Haitians.  On Jan. 8, it announced ending TPS for 200,000 immigrants from El Salvador.  TPS is granted to immigrants from countries suffering from natural disasters or civil wars.  Sam Ordóñez: How is the decision to end TPS affecting the Haitian community?André FrançoisAndré François: It’s really alarming. A group of Haitians, after the earthquake, came here and got TPS, the temporary protective status, to stay here and since that time some of them went on to have children and build some kind of life for themselves. Some of them even bought houses and then have babies born here. If you tell them that you’re not gonna renew TPS for them, it’s devastating. It puts them at a big setback, let alone talking about deporting them, sending them home and breaking families.You’re having people who are selling their belongings at a lower price just to liquidate them. Everybody is worried about what is what, what are they gonna do?And home is not that good still. It’s even worse than after the earthquake. I’ve heard the president saying, “They no longer have hardship down there.” They have more hardship than ever!Even with the new [Haitian] president in place and things seem to be going somewhat in order, you still have the famine, you still have a country with no work, with no infrastructure, with nothing. Some of the people actually would rather go to jail, because in jail they would have a meal, they would be safe.We are good people, everybody knows that. We work hard. We have the greatest doctors, surgeons, just about in every state. If you go down to Boston Medical Center right now you’ll find a doctor named Doctor Larrieux, from Haiti. He’s one of the top surgeons in the country, graduated from Harvard, teaching the other doctors. He speaks the same Creole I speak. He came in here already old and with his knowledge.I was a Dreamer without a green card. And I was given a chance and now I have become the president of a fairly large local union.SO: How will this decision affect the bus drivers? Why is this a union issue?AF: Let’s put it this way: We have 900 drivers here and 90 percent are Haitian. Out of the 90 percent, you may have a good 10 to 20 percent who may have TPS that we may not know about. From the earthquake in 2010 to now is almost eight years. We have like 300 to 400 people hired from 2010 until now, and maybe a good 100 of them might have TPS.They’re not going to come out and tell you what they have. But as president of the union, I know a few that came to me confidentially and told me that they have this issue. And that’s going to be a problem for the city of Boston that has good, decent bus drivers picking up their kids, dropping off their kids, having a family, already situated.The workforce is gonna lose that driver. They’re already short on drivers. It will be a sort of job action without us doing a job action as a union.I think all this stems from the racism of the government, from the very top, like Donald Trump for example and his clan, the people around him, who surround him. Even recently the attacks on Haitian workers, right after he says that Haiti is a shithole country he came out with some more hatred, talking about banning, dismantling or disregarding all the programs that used to bring farmers and low-skill workers from Haiti. So this vendetta is not only racist, it’s inhuman.[Author’s note: the Trump administration recently decided to remove Haiti from the list of countries eligible for H-2A and H-2B visas used for seasonal agricultural and low-skill work.]SO: What is the union doing to build solidarity and to fight back against these decisions?AF: Well, I personally went to a lot of rallies and a lot of protests, and demanded meetings. I was at the Statehouse not too long ago talking about DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] and TPS. So we fight against it, and we send some messages to the powers that be, down to Beacon Hill and down to the Statehouse. We write resolutions and we participate in all the meetings.SO: How are workers in the bus yards and at the union meetings talking about these decisions? What kind of discussions are happening?AF: We heard the rules, we heard what some of the lawyers are saying. We talked about how we can fight it in solidarity with other unions that have a significant amount of TPS workers as well and then do everything that we can do to correct that, to make this president think differently, to bring in some new laws or pass some resolutions that will permit these people to become permanent so they can continue to live in the society in this country in peace. That TPS actually breaks families, leaves people in fear, all kinds of problems.SO: How can the broader community in Boston and the rest of the U.S. help win this fight? What can those of us who are citizens do to help fight against these attacks?AF: It has to be some grassroot work, some grassroots where everybody, whether you’re a TPS holder, or a citizen or whatever, you come out and be involved. We need more networks, we need more outreach. Spread the word until everybody has that, y’know, old school stuff. Come out in full [support] in every demonstration and voice their opinion about how important it is for the government to extend TPS. Give the people not only an extension but permanent residency to stay in the country.SO: The last thing I wanted to ask you about is the significance of the 1804 Movement that’s going on right now in New York.AF: 1804 is the year of our independence. It was why you notice that every 1st of January that Haitian people are celebrating with squash soup, which was a delicacy for the slaves. The white folks would have the slaves cook the soup for them and then the slaves would not be able to eat or drink from that soup.Better yet, they couldn’t even taste it to see if it was good. They had to grab the soup and give it to the white master and say, “Master, can you taste it to see if it’s good?” And they’d taste it and they’d say, “It’s alright, its good. We can have it. You can’t even taste it while you’re washing the dishes.”So the slaves resolved they would make a movement to try to be independent, just like Malcolm X says, “By any means necessary.” Any means necessary for the slaves at that time was to burn the houses and decapitate their [masters’] heads.In 1804, Haiti was the poorest place and the only one that took its independence and that was effective. The only mis effectiveness that was in it was that [the colonizers] left us with no resources, and instead of helping, they exploited the country, by getting all the mines and all the gold and all the resources the country had under the ground, above the ground, and then they didn’t help. They want to leave the country instead of repairing it. So it’s that demand for reparations that would be doing something for Haiti.So 1804 can come back again, and we’ll let them know that it will come back again. There’s some more of the same 1804 folks still around and we’ve got a lot more where that came from. So Trump better know that we’re not gonna lay down and take his attacks like that.The other day, I was in a meeting with the CEO of Boston Public Schools. I told him, given the number of Haitians we have in the city driving school buses, I already alerted all the parents that we’re not happy about what Trump’s talking about, and Trump’s decision on TPS, and a whole bunch of other issues, particularly that thing that Trump talks about the “shithole countries.”Trump might create, in essence, his own work action, his own strike, because if everybody is doing something to respond to him, and to go after him about TPS, we’re going to be participating. We’re gonna participate real big.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Cancer Support Community Pasadena Adds 2 New Staff Members

first_img Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Cancer Support Community Pasadena Adds 2 New Staff Members From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 | 2:19 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff HerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHow To Lose Weight & Burn Fat While You SleepHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeauty 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it center_img Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Mario Haug, Executive Director of Cancer Support Community Pasadena, announces the addition of two new Development Staff Members. Patricia Ostiller is Director of Development – Major Gifts/Planned Giving. Carey Lewis Mott is Director of Development – Grants. “We are beyond thrilled to add these two terrific seasoned professionals to our development staff. Carey and Patricia will play an integral role in securing resources as we work to expand our programs for cancer patients and their family members” , says Mario Haug.About Cancer Support CommunityCancer Support Community (CSCP) located at 200 East Del Mar Boulevard, Ste. 118, Pasadena is one of 50 Cancer Support Community affiliates located throughout the United States. Established in September 1990, the group ensures that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action, and sustained by community. CSCP has free programs that complement medical care, providing networking and support groups, workshops, education and social activities to cancer patients, care-givers, and those who have lost a loved one to cancer. The agency projects more than 12,000 visits between January and December 2015. CSCP is a private 501c 3 corporation governed by a local Board of Directors. All expenses are underwritten each year entirely by donations received from individuals, corporations and foundations. www.cscpasadena.org Community News Make a comment Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDSlast_img read more

Pasadena Detectives Tie January Double Murder to December Killing of Brandon Douglas

first_imgHome of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News latest #1 Pasadena Detectives Tie January Double Murder to December Killing of Brandon Douglas Published on Saturday, April 22, 2017 | 1:13 pm Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment More Cool Stuffcenter_img Subscribe Herbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyJennifer Lopez And Alex Rodriguez’s Wedding DelayedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Photo of Brandon Douglas. Photo courtesy Pasadena Police DepartmentOn Thursday, December 22, 2016 at about 9:47 p.m., Pasadena Police Officers responded to a call of a shooting in the 1200 Block of North Fair Oaks Avenue. Upon arrival, Officers located an African-American male victim, age 25, suffering from multiple gunshot wounds.The victim was transported to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased. The victim was identified as Pasadena resident Brandon Douglas.On January 6, 2017 several people gathered in the area of 100 West Claremont at a curb-side vigil in honor of Brandon Douglas. A shooting occurred and two Pasadena residents attending the vigil were murdered.Detectives working the two cases said Saturday they have discovered evidence linking the two homicides, resulting in fresh leads and a composite sketch of a person believed involved in Douglas’ murder.The suspect is described as a black man about 30 to 35 years of age with a dark complexion, approximately 5’10” to 5’11” tall and weighing 185 to 200 pounds.Homicide/Assault investigators are asking members of the public who may have information regarding the murder or the composite sketch to contact the Pasadena Police at 626-744-4241 24/7 or Homicide Investigators (626) 744-4511.You may also report information anonymously at lacrimestoppers.gov (insert key word Pasadena). 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy last_img read more

Gordo Touts Hands-On Approach in Final Appeal to Voters

first_img Community News Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News More Cool Stuff CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Now spoke with Councilman Victor Gordo on the eve of Tuesday’s election for mayor against incumbent Terry Tornek to hear his final thoughts before voters go to the polls.If Gordo wins, he will be the city’s third elected mayor in modern times.He has the support of former Mayor Bill Paparian, who served on the Board of City Directors, what the council was previously called, and rotated into the position.And Gordo has the backing of former Mayor Bill Bogaard, the city’s first elected mayor in modern times.Gordo is also endorsed by Vice Mayor Tyron Hampton, Councilman Steve Madison and incoming District 2 Councilwoman Felicia Williams.Gordo finished first in a field of four candidates in the March primary, winning 18,586 votes, or 46.52 percent, to Tornek’s 16,607 votes, or 41.57 percent.Gordo and Tornek will square off again on Tuesday, Nov. 3, for the city’s highest elected position.Pasadena Now: What is it you want voters to be thinking about right now?Victor Gordo: Let’s work together to address the significant impacts of COVID both as a health issue and an economic issue. I’m going to work very hard to ensure that the City Council is working together with residents and business owners to ensure that Pasadena residents are safe as we move forward.I ask that residents look closely at my record of service and the dedication that I brought working for the residents of Pasadena. And I’m going to continue to represent the people of Pasadena so every decision that is made is in the best interest of the residents of this city. Everything from public safety to budget actions, social justice impacts of COVID, we will take [these issues] seriously and address them together.What are the challenges facing us and how will you deal with those or address those in the coming years?The health and economic impacts of COVID and ensuring that the city is responsive on both of those very important issues, the city budget, working with residents and neighbors alike to ensure that we’re meeting the needs of the city and keeping our local government workingIt’s an unprecedented crisis. I take a very hands-on approach. I have from the beginning of COVID. It’s going to require that we continue a hands-on approach. I believe that I’ve proven that I’m the candidate to do that.The economic fallout and businesses closing down could impact us for a long time.We’ll have to remain vigilant both on the health and economic impacts, and ensure that we move swiftly to address those issues. That’s why, when COVID struck, I moved quickly to get us back to work. You will recall we were canceling meetings. I demanded that we not do that and that we instead get our city government back to work, to put in place guidelines for businesses to operate, to better protect skilled nursing facilities, seniors who live in them, and guidelines for people to move in and around the city. And I’m going to continue that very direct and hands-on approach.A lot of businesses recently have had to rethink their business model. How does the city address those needs?We’ll have to be quick, but not hurry. We’ll have to be quick to get it under control as things change, but we cannot hurry. We have to be thoughtful and comprehensive in our response. We’ll have to be quick to understand the changes that COVID presents. We have to be on top of the changes and adjustments that need to be made as COVID changes, but we also have to ensure that we’ll be thoughtful in our approach. I’m committed to continuing in my hands-on approach and working with my colleagues on the city council.Any last thoughts?I just want to thank the voters for participating in our democratic process. I am committed to working very hard. I was proud to finish first in the primary. We feel very good about tomorrow’s outcome. We’re certainly not overconfident, but I’m honored and humbled to have had such a positive reaction from the residents of Pasadena for my campaign.center_img Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Top of the News Community News Gordo Touts Hands-On Approach in Final Appeal to Voters Voters go to the polls on Tuesday By ANDRÉ COLEMAN and DAVID CROSS Published on Monday, November 2, 2020 | 6:10 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBollywood Star Transformations: 10 Year ChallengeHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

With Apartment Living on the Rise, Where Does That leave the Single Family Market?

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / With Apartment Living on the Rise, Where Does That leave the Single Family Market?  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save About Author: Staff Writer Q4 of 2016 saw a rise in completion of multifamily homes, including apartments and condominiums, according to the most recent Survey of Market Absoption (SOMA), which is produced by the U.S. Census Bureau in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Apartment completions—classified as buildings with 5 or more units—rose to 73,300 in the final quarter of 2016, a 9 percent increase year-over-year from 67,300. Similarly, condominiums and co-op completions were up to 6,500 from 3,200 a year prior. In the last two years, there have been over 250,000 new apartments entering the market, and the number of completed condominiums has more than double from 2014 to 2016—increasing from 8,000 units to 19,000 units. Absorption, however, has been down for both apartments and condominiums. The number of apartments rented within 3 months of their completion was at a near-decade low—48 percent—compared to 55 percent a year prior. Absorption numbers haven’t been below 50 percent since Q4 of 2009. Condominium absorption numbers are also faltering at a much higher rate than apartments. Only 47 percent of condos completed were absorbed in Q4 2016, compared to 81 percent in Q4 2015. The last time condominium absorption rates saw numbers that low was in Q4 2011. The report notes that, because completions of new multifamily housing has been on the rise for the last couple of years, it is not out of the ordinary that absorption would slow in the face of a larger inventory. The slowdown, although steep compared to Q3, does not entirely point to an emerging trend, the report also notes. Apartment absorption has been on the rise since Q3 of 2015, and condominium absorption has stayed above the latest dip in Q2 of 2015 for six straight quarters. June 23, 2017 1,732 Views Tagged with: Absorption Multifamily homes SOMA Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Absorption Multifamily homes SOMA 2017-06-23 Staff Writer Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agocenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago With Apartment Living on the Rise, Where Does That leave the Single Family Market? Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, News Previous: Defaults: How Low Can They Go? Next: Are the Days of the Seller’s Market Numbered? The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

[Column] ‘Plain Is Fine: Law, Legislation, And Language’ , By Justice Dama Seshadri Naidu

first_imgColumns[Column] ‘Plain Is Fine: Law, Legislation, And Language’ , By Justice Dama Seshadri Naidu Justice Dama Seshadri Naidu26 July 2020 6:49 AMShare This – xRecently, Section 65B of the Indian Evidence Act was subjected to close judicial scrutiny in Arjun Panditrao Khotkar v.Kailash Kushanrao Gorantyal (decided on 14 July 2020). A three-Judge Bench of the Apex Court, on a reference, has ruled on the provision’s legislative scope and purpose. Besides the judgment, I have read a few articles on it in LiveLaw. I do not intend to—nor can…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginRecently, Section 65B of the Indian Evidence Act was subjected to close judicial scrutiny in Arjun Panditrao Khotkar v.Kailash Kushanrao Gorantyal (decided on 14 July 2020). A three-Judge Bench of the Apex Court, on a reference, has ruled on the provision’s legislative scope and purpose. Besides the judgment, I have read a few articles on it in LiveLaw. I do not intend to—nor can I actually—join the issue. But what caught my attention is the language used in that provision; that prompted me to write this article, to underline the importance of plain language even in the legislative domain. Common law country as we are, Parliament is our principal lawgiver. It thinks in legislation. That legislative thought takes shape through the skin of some language—usually English. No doubt, India is a veritable tower of babel with a tangle of tongues to speak in. But for various reasons—historical, political, and so on—we have chosen English as our principal legislative language. This language prides itself as a global language, but it cannot claim perfection, perfection to communicate a thought as was conceived in mind. Every language is imperfect. It is as imperfect as the speaker. And this imperfection or imprecision gets compounded when the language is not the speaker’s mother tongue. Thronton’s Legislative Drafting[1] bemoans that the relationship between language and the environment in which a proposed law is to have an effect is “always of great practical importance to the legislative drafter because of the risk that communication will fail. It is especially so in circumstances where the language of legislation is not the language of a society which the law is to regulate. The law may contain, and indeed may rely on to make it meaningful, concepts or mental images which are unknown to the society concerned and may be virtually impossible to translate adequately into the mother tongue of that society.” Words are frozen thoughts; when we speak, they melt into meaning on our tongue. This melting engages not only our tongue but our entire body. Actually, when we speak we communicate more with our body than with the words we use. But how about the words that remain on paper? With the absence of animating or articulating speaker, we, as the readers, expect the written material to be plain, precise and, possibly, perfect for us to understand. That is, we expect the writing to be simple and straight as if the writer were speaking from the page. So writing as plain as speaking is worthy of everyone’s effort. The legislation is no exception. With time, everything has moved and changed. Our laws have changed, our practices have changed, our values have changed. Everything has been transformed—for good or for bad. But one thing has braved it all and remained unchanged, resisting the tidal wave of change. That is the legal language, more particularly legislative language. As Justice Kirby, formerly of the High Court of Australia, has said, “[T]he construction of statutes is now, probably, the single most important aspect of legal and judicial work.[2]” But how comfortable are the courts, including the lawyers and laypersons, in this pursuit? A Division Bench of Kerala High Court in Kannan Devan Hills Plantations Company Pvt., Ltd. v. ACIT[3], in a ‘linguistic aside’, has commented on the cognitive complexity any reader faces in understanding the provisions of the Income Tax Act. According to it, the Income Tax Act is one enactment that can shatter anyone’s linguistic confidence or competence. Each provision—inevitably, though—runs into pages, superordinate clauses, subordinate clauses, and sub-subordinate clauses piling up in syntactic curlicues. With annual addition, the provisions lose coherence and defy comprehension. Neither a lawyer nor a Judge can claim with comfort, if not with confidence, that he could comprehend the provision at least on a rereading; the taxpayer is surely lost in a maze of meandering phrases. It is, therefore, time for the Revenue to host on their website a plain English version of the enactment—only a suggestion, however. Even the native speakers of the language—notably the USA and the UK—have redrafted, and have been redrafting, the bulk of their legislation in plain language. In the USA, the Federal and the State Governments apart, the Uniform Law Commission, “a non-profit organisation of volunteers promoting uniformity of laws throughout the United States”, has involved legal-linguistic experts like Bryan A Garner and Joseph Kimble for this purpose. So notes Kannan Devan Hills Plantations Company. Strange as it may sound, the United States Congress has brought out legislation—Plain Writing Act of 2010—to “enhance citizen access to Government information and services by establishing that Government documents issued to the public must be written clearly, and for other purposes.” True, it is not about the legislation but about the boundless officialese or bureaucratese, a universal blight on a citizen’s access to information. Section 2 of the Plain Writing Act underlines the purpose of that Act: “[T]o improve the effectiveness and accountability of Federal agencies to the public by promoting clear Government communication that the public can understand and use.” Now, let us see Section 65-B of the Evidence Act. It reads: 65-B. Admissibility of electronic records.—(1) Notwithstanding anything contained in this Act, any information contained in an electronic record which is printed on a paper, stored, recorded or copied in optical or magnetic media produced by a computer (hereinafter referred to as the computer output) shall be deemed to be also a document, if the conditions mentioned in this section are satisfied in relation to the information and computer in question and shall be admissible in any proceedings, without further proof or production of the original, as evidence of any contents of the original or of any fact stated therein of which direct evidence would be admissible. (2) The conditions referred to in sub-section (1) in respect of a computer output shall be the following, namely— (a) the computer output containing the information was produced by the computer during the period over which the computer was used regularly to store or process information for the purposes of any activities regularly carried on over that period by the person having lawful control over the use of the computer; (b) during the said period, information of the kind contained in the electronic record or of the kind from which the information so contained is derived was regularly fed into the computer in the ordinary course of the said activities; (c) throughout the material part of the said period, the computer was operating properly or, if not, then in respect of any period in which it was not operating properly or was out of operation during that part of the period, was not such as to affect the electronic record or the accuracy of its contents; and (d) the information contained in the electronic record reproduces or is derived from such information fed into the computer in the ordinary course of the said activities. (3) Where over any period, the function of storing or processing information for the purposes of any activities regularly carried on over that period as mentioned in clause (a) of sub-section (2) was regularly performed by computers, whether— (a) by a combination of computers operating over that period; or (b) by different computers operating in succession over that period; or (c) by different combinations of computers operating in succession over that period; or (d) in any other manner involving the successive operation over that period, in whatever order, of one or more computers and one or more combinations of computers, all the computers used for that purpose during that period shall be treated for the purposes of this section as constituting a single computer; and references in this section to a computer shall be construed accordingly. (4) In any proceedings where it is desired to give a statement in evidence by virtue of this section, a certificate doing any of the following things, that is to say,— (a) identifying the electronic record containing the statement and describing the manner in which it was produced; (b) giving such particulars of any device involved in the production of that electronic record as may be appropriate for the purpose of showing that the electronic record was produced by a computer; (c) dealing with any of the matters to which the conditions mentioned in sub-section (2) relate, and purporting to be signed by a person occupying a responsible official position in relation to the operation of the relevant device or the management of the relevant activities (whichever is appropriate) shall be evidence of any matter stated in the certificate; and for the purposes of this sub-section it shall be sufficient for a matter to be stated to the best of the knowledge and belief of the person stating it. (5) For the purposes of this section,— (a) information shall be taken to be supplied to a computer if it is supplied thereto in any appropriate form and whether it is so supplied directly or (with or without human intervention) by means of any appropriate equipment; (b) whether in the course of activities carried on by any official, information is supplied with a view to its being stored or processed for the purposes of those activities by a computer operated otherwise than in the course of those activities, that information, if duly supplied to that computer, shall be taken to be supplied to it in the course of those activities; (c) a computer output shall be taken to have been produced by a computer whether it was produced by it directly or (with or without human intervention) by means of any appropriate equipment. Explanation.—For the purposes of this section any reference to information being derived from other information shall be a reference to its being derived therefrom by calculation, comparison or any other process. First, it is impossible for anyone to understand in one reading what this section aims to convey. It requires rereading—one too many. Second, the unwieldy provision makes comprehension a causality. In paragraph 111, Arjun Panditrao Khotkar observes: “Section 65B, in its form, is a poor reproduction of Section 5 of the UK Civil Evidence Act, 1968. The language employed in sub-sections (2), (3), (4) and (5) of Section 65B is almost in pari materia (with minor differences) with sub-sections (2) to (5) of Section of the UK Civil Evidence Act, 1968.” Referring to another provision, Arjun Panditrao Khotkar also complains that “there are too many negatives in the language employed in Section 69”. Let us not forget the UK Civil Evidence Act was drafted in 1968; the amended Section 65B in the Indian Evidence Act was engrafted in 2000. It imports the 1968 language, though. In fact, UK Civil Evidence Act 1968 has already been repealed. In common law countries, especially those countries where English is the mother tongue, the legislative bodies have moved away from the archaic legislative language. To illustrate the modern-day legislative practices, we may refer to any piece of recent legislation either in the UK or in the USA. Let us take one provision from Business and Planning Act 2020 of the UK. Part I of this Act deals with the consumption of food and drink outdoors. It provides for pavement licences. And Section 3 mandates how the applications for the pavement licence should be determined. The provision reads: 2 Applications (1) An application for a pavement licence made to a local authority must— (a) be made in writing and in such form as the authority may specify, (b) be sent to the authority using electronic communications in such manner as the authority may specify, and (c) be accompanied by such fee not exceeding £100 as the local authority may require. (2) An application for a pavement licence made to a local authority must— (a) specify the premises, the part of the relevant highway and the purpose or purposes specified in section 1 (3) to which the application relates, (b) specify the days of the week on which, and the times of day between which, it is proposed to put furniture on the highway, (c) describe the type of furniture to which the application relates, (d) specify the date on which the application is made, (e) contain or be accompanied by such evidence of public liability insurance in respect of anything to be done by the licence-holder pursuant to the licence as the authority may require, and (f) contain or be accompanied by such other information or material as the local authority may require. (3) The local authority to which an application for a pavement licence is made must, in such manner as it considers appropriate— (a) publish the application and any information or material required by the local authority under subsection (2)(f), and (b) publicise the fact that representations relating to the application may be made to the authority during the public consultation period (and indicate when that period comes to an end). (4) In this group of sections, the “public consultation period” means the period of 7 days beginning with the day after that on which the application is made. (5) A person who applies for a pavement licence must— (a) on the day the application is made, fix a notice of the application to the premises so that the notice is readily visible to, and can be read easily by, members of the public who are not on the premises, and (b) secure that the notice remains in place until the end of the public consultation period. (6) A notice under subsection (5) must— (a) be in such form as the local authority to which the application is made may require, (b) state that the application has been made and the date on which it was made, (c) indicate that representations relating to the application may be made to the local authority during the public consultation period (and indicate when that period comes to an end), and (d) contain such other information or material as the local authority may require. (7) For the purposes of this section an application for a pavement licence is made on the day it is sent to the local authority. (8) A person who applies for a pavement licence is to be taken to have agreed— (a) to the use of electronic communications for all purposes relating to the application, and to any licence resulting from the application, which are capable of being carried out electronically, and (b) that the applicant’s address for the purposes of such communications is the address incorporated into, or otherwise logically associated with, the person’s application. (9) Where a person applies for a pavement licence, the person may not make another application for a pavement licence in respect of the same premises before the end of the determination period (see section 3). It is equally a long-winding provision. Agreed. It could have still been better drafted. Agreed again. But see how the short sentences, clear segments, and intra-sectional divisions of the provision improve its comprehension. It contains no “hereinafters”, no “thereins”, no “theretos” and no “thereofs”. Besides, there are no “superordinate clauses, subordinate clauses, and sub-subordinate clauses piling up in syntactic curlicues.” So, let us attempt to put Section 65B in plain English: 65B. Admissibility of electronic records.— (1) Despite this Act, any information printed on a paper, stored, recorded, or copied in optical or magnetic media, from a computer (the computer output) shall also be treated as a document. But to be treated so, it should satisfy the conditions mentioned in this section. Then, the information as a document becomes admissible in any proceedings. Thus produced, it dispenses with further proof or the production of the original, about which direct evidence would be admissible. (2) The conditions referred to in sub-section (1) regarding a computer output shall be the following: (a) the output must have been from a computer which has been used regularly to store or process such information as was retrieved and over which the person concerned has lawful control; (b) [Clause (a) takes care of clause (b), too]. (c) during the period when the retrieved information was fed, the computer must have been operating properly. If the computer was not properly functioning at any other time, that malfunctioning or non-functioning must not have affected the storage and retrieval of the information in question; and (d) the retrieved information must have been fed into the computer in the ordinary course of its functioning. [Actually, clause (a) substantially covers this aspect also.] (3) The information feeding or processing as mentioned in clause (a) of sub-section (2) may have happened— (a) by a combination of computers operating over that period; or (b) by different computers operating in succession over that period; or (c) by different combinations of computers operating in succession over that period; or (d) by one or a network of computers treated as a single computer, in any other manner, in whatever order, over that period. (4) To use the retrieved information as evidence, the person concerned must secure a certificate containing any or all of the following,— (a) identifying the electronic record containing the statement and describing how it was produced; (b) giving such particulars of any device involved in the production of that electronic record as may be appropriate to show that the electronic record was produced by a computer; (c) dealing with the matters to which the conditions mentioned in sub-section (2) relate, signed by a responsible official having control over the device or the device-related activities (whichever is appropriate). Then, that certificate shall be evidence of any matter stated in it; and for this sub-section, it shall be sufficient for the signing authority to attest to the facts in the certificate to the best of his knowledge and belief. (5) For this section,— (a) information shall be taken as supplied to a computer if it has been supplied in any form, directly or indirectly, and with or without human intervention; (b) Information, on occasions, may have been fed to a computer used for other activities. Yet, if the information has been duly fed, it must be taken as fed to the computer in the course of the information-related activity; (c) the computer may give the output directly or indirectly (with appropriate equipment) and with or without human intervention. Explanation.—For this section any reference to information being derived from other information shall be a reference to its being derived therefrom by calculation, comparison, or any other process. No doubt, this is not the version of modal drafting; it may be a version of it. The more you focus on it, the better it comes out. No doubt. I reckon it is time a specialised body like the Law Commission paid attention to it. For decades it has been known for its most cerebral Reports on various legal reforms. If it focuses on suggesting to the legislative bodies about the need to simplify our statutes, it goes a long way in every which way. Research has shown, for instance, insurance regulations drafted in plain language have cut down litigation. It applies to legislation, too. With vague, voluble, archaic words, the legislative intent looking in every direction from the books of statutes, we only end up, as Lord Evershed MR has said, citing some judicial utterance or another “in support of almost any proposition relevant to the problems of statutory interpretation.[4]” It is time we lifted the legal fog from legislation, so the legislative intent, as we call it, is there plainly for all to see. After all, more words do not result in more precision. Let me conclude by invoking Alexander Pope:[5] “Words are like leaves; and where they most abound Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.” Views are personal only.(Author is a Judge at Bombay High Court) [1] Prof. Helen Xanthaki, (Bloomsbury Professional Ltd., 2013 Fifth Edn) 5 [2] As quoted in Andrew Burrow’s Thinking About Statutes (The Hamlyn Lectures, Cambridge University Press, 2018) 3 [3] 400 ITR 43 [4] ‘The Impact of Statute on the Law of England’, Maccabean Lecture in Jurisprudence (1956), as quoted in (n 2) 5 [5] Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Criticism, lines 309-10 Next Storylast_img read more

“Misused Position For Making False, Political And Scandalising Remarks”: Plea In SC To Remove Andhra CM For Allegations Against Justice Ramana

first_imgTop Stories”Misused Position For Making False, Political And Scandalising Remarks”: Plea In SC To Remove Andhra CM For Allegations Against Justice Ramana Akshita Saxena14 Oct 2020 9:18 AMShare This – xTwo practicing Advocates have moved the Supreme Court seeking action against Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, YS Jagan Reddy, for falsely accusing second-senior most Judge of the Court, Justice NV Ramana, of interfering with the administration of justice. The Petitioner-Advocates, GS Mani Pradeep Kumar Yadav, and seek a time bound judicial inquiry into the allegations made against…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginTwo practicing Advocates have moved the Supreme Court seeking action against Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, YS Jagan Reddy, for falsely accusing second-senior most Judge of the Court, Justice NV Ramana, of interfering with the administration of justice. The Petitioner-Advocates, GS Mani Pradeep Kumar Yadav, and seek a time bound judicial inquiry into the allegations made against the sitting judge and an appropriate action against Reddy thereafter. They have also sought issuance of a writ in the nature of Quo Warranto against Reddy, declaring that he has no authority to hold the office of Chief Minister of State of Andhra Pradesh as he is “misusing his position and power as a Chief Minister by making a false, vague, political and scandalized remarks and allegations openly in the public and media against the senior most sitting judge of this Hon’ble Court and render Justice.” The Petitioners have asserted that the Executive should not overtake the judiciary; however in the present case, Reddy has “disturbed” judicial independence by making false allegations against a sitting judge. “No one including these PIL writ petitioners have never or ever entertain corruption in the government as well as in the judiciary. But at the same time independence and integrity of Judiciary is most important. A person who is holding the post of head of the State Executive should not overtake the judiciary by making a false allegations against the sitting judges of the Hon’ble Supreme Court. The general public confidence over the judiciary is paramount important. If public lost their confidence and faith over the judiciary there is no purpose remains,” the plea states. It is submitted that if Reddy was aggrieved over any issue which is pending in the court, he had a full right to challenge the same before the highest forum of court in accordance with law. However, “without taking any legal steps as per law”, he wrote a letter to the CJI, making “vague allegations” against a sitting judge of the Top Court, and even published the same in the public domain, “only to tarnish the image” of the country’s apex judicial institution. The Petitioners have further speculated that Reddy has attempted to lower public confidence in the judiciary, for his personal gain, as he himself is facing many number of criminal cases with the CBI and the Court. On October 11, Y S Jagan Mohan Reddy, the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, wrote a complaint to the Chief Justice of India, S A Bobde, alleging that some High Court judges are attempting to protect the interests of the major opposition party, Telugu Desom Party, in politically sensitive matters. A striking feature of the complaint – details of which were revealed to the media in a presser by Ajaya Kellam, the advisor of the CM, on Saturday evening – was that it had accused senior Supreme Court judge, Justice N V Ramana, who is next in line to be the Chief Justice of India, of influencing the administration of justice in the High Court. A plea has also been moved before the Supreme Court stating that the contents of Reddy’s letter have put the confidence of people in Judiciary at stake. Next Storylast_img read more