Tag: 新419龙凤

Netflix accused of using footage of LacMegantic disaster in second drama

first_imgMONTREAL — A day after learning that a science-fiction show on Netflix used actual footage of the Lac-Megantic rail disaster, the mayor of the Quebec town said she believes images of the tragedy were used in a second Netflix production, “Bird Box.”Lac-Megantic Mayor Julie Morin wants the streaming service to take a look at its movie and TV catalogue to make sure no other production is using images of the tragedy as entertainment.“I don’t know if this is happening all the time, but we are looking for assurances from Netflix that … they are going to remove them,” Morin said in an interview. “You can be sure we are going to follow up on this, and our citizens are on our side.”High school ethics teacher Guillaume Bouchard was watching the most recent season of “Travelers” on Netflix over the holidays when he noticed something oddly familiar on his screen.In the science-fiction series, a nuclear device had just exploded on the streets of London, but instead of seeing fires ravaging locations in the U.K. capital, Bouchard was looking at orange flames towering over a small town. At the end of the street, a black oil tanker burned in the background.“I thought: No way. No way did they do that,” Bouchard said in an interview. He paused the show and after a quick internet search had his suspicions confirmed. The brief images on Netflix were taken from real-life footage of one of the deadliest disasters in recent Canadian history, when a train carrying crude oil derailed, exploded and killed 47 people in Lac-Megantic in 2013.“I don’t know anyone who died in Lac-Megantic,” Bouchard said. “But if I was someone who lost someone close and I was home and I saw this, I don’t know how I would react. It wouldn’t be good.”“Travelers,” created by Canadian Brad Wright, was shot in Vancouver and produced by Peacock Alley Entertainment Inc., originally in association with Netflix and Showcase. Netflix picked up the show as the exclusive distributor for the latest season, the third.Carrie Mudd, president of Toronto-based Peacock Alley Entertainment, said her company acquired the footage from a stock image vendor called Pond 5, which is based in New York City, and they “weren’t aware of its specific source.” A request for comment from Pond 5 was not returned.“We sincerely apologize and had no intention to dishonour the tragic events of 2013,” Mudd said in an email. “We are already working to replace the footage in the show.” As of Tuesday evening, the images were still part of the “Travelers” episode available for viewing on Netflix Canada.A spokesman for Netflix did not want to be interviewed, but said the company has contacted Peacock Alley Entertainment, and confirmed the images would be removed. When asked by email to confirm “Bird Box” also used real-life footage from the disaster, the company said it needed time to look into it.Morin said she first heard of the images used on “Travelers” Monday.“We find that it’s really a lack of respect, to use these images as fiction and entertainment,” she said. “It’s hard enough for our citizens to see these images when they are used normally and respectfully on the news. Just imagine, to have them used as fiction, as if they were invented.”On Tuesday, a Lac-Megantic citizen posted images on social media of the movie “Bird Box,” where in the early moments of the movie, a television newscast used the images for a few seconds to illustrate a town being under attack.Morin said she viewed the footage posted by the citizen. “We see the images (of Lac-Megantic) clearly,” she said. The Canadian Press viewed the footage in “Bird Box”, which is identical to amateur video shot immediately after the derailment. The amateur video can be easily found online.Bouchard said he felt it was his “duty as a citizen” to go public after identifying the Lac-Megantic content. He said he knows what happened was a mistake, but “it needed to be talked about.”He said he also considers it a teachable moment he can use in his ethics class. “Naturally, I will talk about it one day (in school),” he said.Giuseppe Valiante, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Celebrities Support Californias Proposition 37

first_img“You can’t handle the truth” about your food, insists Bill Maher in a humorous Public Service Announcement released this week to support California’s Proposition 37. Early voting began yesterday in California.
 
The parody video, which premiered on Extra!, features Maher and nine other celebrities — Danny DeVito, Dave Matthews, Jillian Michaels, Kristin Bauer van Straten, Emily Deschanel, Kaitlin Olson, Glenn Howerton, John Cho and KaDee Strickland – poking fun at the ludicrous arguments against labeling genetically engineered foods.
 
The video ends with a passionate appeal for voters to pass Proposition 37, which would make California the first state to require labeling of genetically engineered foods.Opponents of Prop 37, including giant pesticide and processed food companies, are spending $35 million in an effort to defeat consumers’ right to know about GMOs.
 
See the video here.
 
The video was sponsored by Food & Water Watch, which is working to raise money to get it on network television.
 
“While the parody of the food and pesticide companies’ arguments in opposition to Prop 37 is humorous, there really is nothing funny about the fact that Californians lack the most basic information about the food we eat,” said Food & Water Watch Pacific Region Director Kristin Lynch. “We hope the fans of these popular artists share this video with everyone they know to spread the word about how important it is to vote yes on Prop 37 to make GE labeling the law.”
 
“We’re proud to stand with these celebrities, the 2,100 endorsing organizations, and the millions of moms, dads and consumer advocates across California who are saying Yes on 37 because we have the right to know what’s in our food,” said Stacy Malkan, media director for Yes on 37.Other celebrities supporting Prop 37 include Chevy Chase, Maroon 5, Daryl Hannah, Russell Simmons, Rashida Jones, Elijah Wood, Alicia Silverstone and Jack Johnson.
 
For more information on Prop 37, visit www.carighttoknow.orglast_img read more

Amazon Blasts FAA for Slowness on Drone Regulation

first_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. E-commerce power Amazon.com blasted federal regulators on Tuesday for being slow to approve commercial drone testing, saying the United States is falling behind other countries in the potentially lucrative area of unmanned aviation technology.Less than a week after the Federal Aviation Administration gave Amazon.com the green light to test a delivery drone outdoors, the company told U.S. lawmakers that the prototype drone had already become obsolete while the company waited more than six months for the agency’s permission.”We don’t test it anymore. We’ve moved on to more advanced designs that we already are testing abroad,” said Paul Misener, Amazon.com’s vice president for global public policy.”Nowhere outside of the United States have we been required to wait more than one or two months to begin testing,” Misener said in written testimony submitted to the Senate Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety and Security.Misener said Amazon had applied on Friday for permission to test a more advanced drone system and now hopes for quicker approval.The Amazon.com case illustrates the frustrations of many companies and industry lobbyists, who say the U.S. regulatory process is not keeping up with rapidly developing drone technology that could generate new revenues and cost savings for a range of industries.Misener, who was scheduled to join a witness panel at the subcommittee hearing, said European and other international authorities have more “reasonable” approaches that recognize the potential economic benefits of commercial drone operations.”This low level of government attention and slow pace are inadequate, especially compared to the regulatory efforts in other countries,” Misener said.”The (FAA) already has adequate statutory authority. What the FAA needs is impetus, lest the United States fall further behind,” he added.Seattle-based Amazon.com, the largest e-commerce company in the United States, wants to use drones to deliver packages to its customers over distances of 10 miles (16 km)or more, which would require drones to travel autonomously while equipped with technology to avoid collisions with other aircraft.The FAA recently proposed rules that would lift the current ban on most commercial drone flights, but several restrictions attached would make package delivery and other business applications unfeasible.Among other constraints, the proposed rules would limit commercial drones to an altitude of 500 feet (150 meters), allow flights only during daytime and require operators to keep the aircraft in sight at all times.The agency does not expect to finalize the rules until late 2016 or early 2017, according to government officials. During this period, the current ban will stay in place; companies can apply for exemptions to use drones for specific business applications.The FAA has been slow to grant exemptions, however, granting only 48 of several hundred requests.The Republican-led subcommittee called the hearing to examine the agency’s efforts to integrate unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, safely into U.S. airspace. Industry forecasters say that drones would generate nearly $14 billion of U.S. economic activity in the first three years of integration and $82 billion over a decade.Meanwhile, Australia, Canada, France and the United Kingdom have progressed toward airspace integration and allow for commercial use, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said in a report to the subcommittee.Australia has granted operating certificates to 185 businesses, while several European countries have granted licenses to more than 1,000 operators, according to the report.While the GAO said overseas restrictions are similar to those proposed by the FAA, it noted that France has begun to allow beyond-line-of-sight operations on a limited basis.(Additional reporting by Allison Lampert in Montreal Editing by Soyoung Kim and Jonathan Oatis) 4 min read Register Now » March 24, 2015 This story originally appeared on Reuters Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalslast_img read more