Podcast Mysterious fast radio bursts and longlasting effects of childhood cancer treatments

first_imgESO/L. Calçada Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Daniel Clery about the many, many theories surrounding fast radio bursts—extremely fast, intense radio signals from outside the galaxy—and a new telescope coming online that may help sort them out.Also this week, Sarah talks with Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel about her story on researchers’ attempts to tackle the long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment. The survival rate for some pediatric cancers is as high as 90%, but many survivors have a host of health problems. Jennifer’s feature is part of a special section on pediatric cancer.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: ESO/L. Calçada; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of bizarre sloths

first_img iStock.com/sdominick Jorge Blanco Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of ‘bizarre’ sloths In one of the new studies, paleoprotein expert Samantha Presslee of the University of York in the United Kingdom and her colleagues sampled more than 100 sloth fossils from across North and South America for traces of collagen. This protein is prevalent in bones, and can stick around for more than 1 million years. In 17 samples the researchers analyzed, the collagen was preserved well enough that they were able to piece together the amino acid sequences that form the building blocks of proteins. That allowed them to compare the various collagens—one of which was more than 130,000 years old—and build likely family trees, which they describe today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. From elephant-size animals that browsed North American grasslands to moose-size swimmers that plied the Pacific coast of South America, sloths have roamed Earth for more than 50 million years. Yet scientists know little about how the dozens of known species are related to each other. Now, two new analyses of ancient sloth DNA and proteins—some of which are more than 100,000 years old—are rewriting the sloth family tree. The studies even suggest a land bridge connected the West Indies with South America 30 million years ago, allowing the slow-moving animals to reach the islands.“It’s a remarkable achievement,” says Timothy Gaudin, a paleontologist at the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga, who was not involved in the work.Of the more than 100 sloth species identified, all but six are extinct. So scientists have had to compare the shapes of fossil bones to piece together how the animals evolved. Such comparisons are not clear-cut, however, and new techniques for isolating DNA and proteins from fossils have made it possible to compare the genetics of long-extinct animals. Ancient DNA allows scientists to compare genes directly, but proteins last longer. So although they provide less precise information, paleontologists are increasingly using them to study even older fossils. A sloth at rest Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Genetic analysis suggests today’s three-toed sloths (top) are related to the giant ground sloths Megatherium (right) and Megalonyx (center), whereas modern two-toed sloths (upper right) are cousins of the South American Mylodon (left). Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Working independently, evolutionary biologist Frédéric Delsuc of the University of Montpellier in France and colleagues analyzed nearly full mitochondrial DNA sequences—the genetic material found in a cell’s energy-producing machinery—from 10 sloth fossils, ranging in age from 10,000 to 45,000 years old. They, too, used the data to draw likely sloth family trees, which the group describes today in Current Biology.The two teams came to strikingly similar conclusions: Today’s three-toed sloths don’t form their own branch on the tree as previously thought, but are related to the giant ground sloth, Megalonyx, which lived in North America until about 15,000 years ago. And today’s two-toed sloths are distant cousins of the giant South American Mylodon, believed to be the last ground sloth to go extinct, less than 10,000 years ago.Perhaps most surprising, the wide variety of now-extinct sloths that lived on the islands of the West Indies until about 5000 years ago all seem to have evolved from a common ancestor that lived about 30 million years ago. “Nobody had ever suggested that,” Gaudin says. That means a single population of sloths likely reached the islands just once. That fits with a theory that, instead of swimming or drifting, many animals reached the islands by walking over a land bridge that appeared about 30 million years ago and later was submerged.“The fact that the [two studies] agree with one another is really interesting,” Gaudin says. But, he cautions, the analysis only includes a fraction of the known species. “There are loads of different extinct sloths that we could add to the tree,” Presslee says. “That’s the next step.”Combining data from fossil shapes with the genetic data could produce even better trees, says Gerardo De Iuliis, a paleontologist at the University of Toronto in Canada. That might reveal how certain sloth traits—like the long, powerful forearms that allow today’s sloths to move while hanging from branches—arose independently multiple times. “They are bizarre animals that are bizarre in similar ways,” Gaudin says. By Gretchen VogelJun. 6, 2019 , 11:00 AM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Gut bacteria could be key to producing tastier cows milk

first_img It’s not just good breeding and tasty grass that make a dairy cow a champion milk producer. It’s also the microbes that live in the animal’s gut. Now, researchers say they know which microbes lead to the best milk.The finding suggests new ways to improve milk and reduce methane emissions from cows—a major source of the greenhouse gas—says Diego Morgavi, an animal scientist at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research in Clermont-Ferrand-Theix who was not involved with the work.Cows and other ruminants such as goats and sheep have a special stomach called a rumen that houses millions of microbes. These organisms break down hay, grass, and other hard-to-digest plant material into usable nutrients and calories. A downside is that ruminants burp and fart out 100 million tons of microbe-generated methane a year worldwide, making them the second-biggest human-related contributor of this greenhouse gas, after rice cultivation. Eddie Cloud/Alamy Stock Photo Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Gut bacteria could be key to producing tastier cow’s milk Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Elizabeth PennisiJul. 3, 2019 , 2:00 PM Email To see how these microbes play a role in milk quality and methane production, Itzik Mizrahi, a biologist at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, Israel, teamed up with John Wallace, an animal scientist at the University of Aberdeen in the United Kingdom, to characterize the microbes in several herds of cows and to see whether those microbes influence any of hundreds of traits, such as growth rate, milk quality and quantity, and methane production.They collected microbial DNA and information about those traits from more than 1000 cows on seven farms in the United Kingdom, Italy, Sweden, and Finland. The cows were Holsteins and Norwegian Reds—two breeds that constitute the majority of dairy livestock in Europe.From the DNA, the team identified the microbes in each cow’s gut and compared communities to see what bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and other microbes they had in common. Then the researchers used machine learning—sophisticated computer programs that can find connections among massive amounts of disparate data—to figure out how microbes might influence particular traits.Although each cow had a unique microbiome, half of the animals had 512 microbial species in common, the team reports today in Science Advances. The analyses indicated that 39 “core microbes” are more powerful than genes in determining how tasty a cow’s milk is, and even how much methane it produces.Gut microbes have a surprisingly powerful effect on these traits, says Fabio Lima, who studies the cow microbiome and milk production at the University of Illinois in Urbana. Morgavi would like to see whether other cow breeds have the same core microbes. But in the meantime, he thinks that giving certain microbes to calves in their food—similar to probiotics people take—might reduce methane production.Manipulating an entire population of microbes will be challenging, notes Lima, who is already trying to do just that to improve milk taste or quantity. But at least it’s now clear that adding certain microbes to the gut can make a difference, Wallace says. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

LJI and UC San Diego awarded 45 million as part of NCIs

first_img Source:https://www.lji.org/news-events/news/post/la-jolla-institute-receives-4-5-mill-cancer-moonshot-award/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 19 2018Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) and UC San Diego have been awarded $ 4.5 million as part of the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Moonshot initiative. The funding will support research to develop new and improved immunotherapeutic treatment options for patients with head and neck cancer.Led by LJI Professor Stephen Schoenberger, Ph.D., a widely recognized authority on personalized cancer vaccines, the collaborative research effort is part of the Immuno-Oncology Translational Network (IOTN), which was established as part of the Cancer Moonshot with the express goal of accelerating translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications to improve immunotherapy outcomes.The LJI effort brings together the wide-ranging expertise of researchers and clinicians at La Jolla Institute and the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center to advance current immunotherapeutic options and develop novel precision approaches such as personalized cancer vaccines and cellular therapies for the treatment of head and neck cancer and related malignancies.”Neoantigens offer an unprecedented opportunity for attacking tumors in a specific and effective manner based on the altered genes they express,” says Schoenberger, “and this funding will accelerate the development of new therapies based on this premise.”Cancer immunotherapies build on the fact that the immune system can recognize and eliminate tumor cells by targeting molecules only found on the surface of tumor cells. Just like homing beacons, these so called “neo-antigens” guide T cells to their targets where they then unleash their destructive powers.Tumor associated neo-antigens are the result of tumor-specific genetic alterations or, as is often the case in head and neck cancer, the random integration of human papillomavirus into the genome. Identifying clinically relevant neo-antigens in cancers with moderate levels of mutations, such as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), has proven challenging since only a tiny fraction of predicted neo-antigens actually generate a T cell response.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”Tumor neo-antigens are highly variable and no two tumors are alike, which represents a challenge but also the opportunity to create highly personalized treatments,” explains LJI Professor Bjoern Peters, Ph.D., a bioinformatician, who has developed a number of tools to predict and analyze which parts of a pathogen, allergen or cancer cell is recognized and targeted by the immune system. “As we learn more about which features trigger a strong immune response, we can fine-tune our predictions.”Building on their expertise in predicting and verifying neo-antigen T cell responses, Schoenberger’s team will specifically focus on identifying tumor neo-antigens that can fire up tumor-specific immune responses.The validated neo-antigens will be further analyzed in HNSCC tumor models in collaboration with Professor J. Silvio Gutkind, Ph.D., Associate Director, Basic Science at Moores Cancer Center, who is particularly interested in the molecular basis of oral and head and neck cancers.As part of the collaboration, LJI Professor Anjana Rao, Ph.D., will explore the role of T cell exhaustion in mouse and human HNSCC. So-called T cell exhaustion is the result of prolonged overactivity of immune cells summoned to a tumor or infection site and effectively shuts down their ability to dispatch tumor cells.”This effort is so critical because we need to develop better therapies for patients with head and neck cancer. This is a devastatingly deadly disease and all the science points to improving outcomes by activating the immune system through boosting neoantigen specific T cells. This grant will allow us to lay the essential translational foundation to move better treatments to patients,” says Professor Ezra Cohen, M.D., Associate Director, Translational Science, at Moores Cancer Center. “I am very excited to be working with exceptional researchers at LJI and the opportunity to learn how to devise effective immunotherapies that counter exhaustion and re-motivate T cells to eradicate a patient’s tumor.”last_img read more

Researchers develop new device that improves balance in veterans with Gulf War

first_img Source:https://www.rutgers.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 5 2018Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers.The study is the first to examine how Gulf War illnesses affect veterans’ vestibular systems, which are integral for balance, memory and brain blood flow.The findings are being presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience this week.This prominent condition affecting Gulf War veterans includes a cluster of medically unexplained chronic symptoms that can also include joint pain, indigestion, insomnia, and dizziness, according to the U.S Department of Veterans Affairs, which supported the study. The disorder affects about 25 percent of the 700,000 veterans who served in Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield in 1990-1991.Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementia”Although it’s been more than 25 years since the conflict, we still do not understand the underlying cause of these symptoms and have yet to develop an effective treatment,” said lead author Jorge M. Serrador, associate professor in the departments of pharmacology, physiology and neuroscience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and a scientist at the New Jersey War Related Illness and Injury Study Center.The researchers examined vestibular function in 60 veterans who participated in Operation Desert Storm/Shield, of which 54 suffered with Gulf War illnesses and six of whom were healthy — as well as 36 civilians who were of the same age and sex. They found that reduced vestibular function and poor balance appear to be prevalent in veterans with Gulf War Illness.To examine if vestibular function and balance could be improved, the researchers developed an electrical stimulator clipped to the earlobe and attached to a Walkman-size box that generated a low-level, random electrical noise pattern that was imperceptible to the wearer.”The electrical stimulation added a random noise pattern into the veterans’ vestibular systems that travelled through the earlobes into the inner ear, which acts like the body’s accelerometer,” Serrador said. “This added noise improved balance in 100 percent of the veterans with Gulf War Illness.”The findings suggest that correcting the vestibular system may treat other conditions associated with Gulf War illnesses.”For these veterans, it’s like walking on a balance beam all day,” Serrador said. “When they’re trying to figure out where they are in space to stay balanced, it’s sapping cognitive reserves for other functions like memory.”The researchers are now testing to see how long the effects last after removing the device. They also will try to determine whether using a portable version of the stimulator helps relieve other symptoms of Gulf War illnesses.Serrador said the technology also could be applied to other populations, such as the elderly who are prone to age-related balance issues.last_img read more

Researchers discover new details of brain pathway related to impulsive behaviors

first_img Source:https://media.ntu.edu.sg/NewsReleases/Pages/newsdetail.aspx?news=849e6e44-6e83-4ccd-87c2-7c549e04f4bd Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 25 2019Researchers from Singapore and South Korea have uncovered new details of a brain pathway that can cause impulsive behaviors.Using mice, the research team led by Professor George Augustine from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), discovered that impulsive behavior is triggered when the brain signaling chemical dopamine is passed to an unexpected area of their brain.The full route that dopamine signals take to produce an impulsive action has not previously been understood. To trace its pathway, Prof Augustine and his team used mice that had a specific set of dopamine receptors (“D2 receptors”) genetically removed, effectively making their brains unable to detect dopamine signals.The researchers artificially activated these receptors in specific parts of the brain, and the mice displayed impulsive behavior when the signal was picked up by the amygdala – an almond-like structure deep in the brain.What came next surprised the researchers: the amygdala’s dopamine receptors in turn passed on the ‘dopamine baton’ to neurons that connect it with the ‘bed nucleus of the stria terminalis’ or BNST, a brain area not previously known to be involved in this pathway.The BNST is a complex brain structure that orchestrates emotional and behavioral responses to stress. Its position in the pathway for impulsive behavior is a new potential target for pharmaceutical developers, which could in turn lead to new treatments to manage this and other neuropsychiatric disorders.”We have shown for the first time that impulsive behavior in mice is only triggered when dopamine signals are received and passed on to an unexpected part of the brain – from the amygdala to the BNST,” said Prof Augustine, a neuroscientist at NTU Singapore’s Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (LKCMedicine).”This research shows that the amygdala serves as a key staging post in the dopamine pathway that triggers impulsive behavior and confirms the role dopamine plays in regulating impulsivity,” he said.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionThe research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), last November, was conducted by Professor Augustine in collaboration with Professor Ja-Hyun Baik and colleagues from the Korea University. Researchers from Korea Institute of Science and Technology, and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Singapore under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) were also part of the team.Commenting on the discovery, Assoc Prof Ong Say How, Senior Consultant and Chief, Department of Developmental Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health, who was not involved in the research, said:”This new finding potentially could usher in novel pharmacological treatments that specifically target the Dopamine D2 receptors located in the central amygdala and the BNST region, bringing about reductions in impulsivity and impulsive behaviors commonly seen in wide-ranging psychiatric conditions and disorders including conduct, anti-social and impulsive-control disorders. Reductions in impulsivity also imply more fore-planning and less risk-taking behaviors that often lead to accidental injuries as well as social, financial and legal problems later in life.”Prof Augustine plans to investigate further into the properties of the amygdala-to-BNST pathway, in order to pave the way for developing therapeutic strategies for controlling impulsive and compulsive behavior.”Through identification of a novel brain circuit for impulsivity we hope to encourage new research into treatment options for other neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), and even depression,” added Prof Augustine.last_img read more

Fractures head injuries common in electric scooter accidents UCLA study finds

first_img Source:http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/fractures-head-injuries-common-e-scooter-collisions? Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 13 2019Study is first to analyze public health impact of emerging personal transportation optionUCLA researchers have found that people involved in electric scooter accidents are sometimes injured badly enough — from fractures, dislocated joints and head injuries — to require treatment in an emergency department.The researchers examined data from 249 people who were treated at the emergency departments of UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, and Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center between Sept. 1, 2017, and Aug. 31, 2018. The study found that about one-third of them arrived by ambulance, an indication of the severity of their injuries.West Los Angeles is the epicenter of the electric scooter phenomenon — Santa Monica was one of the first U.S. cities in which the scooters were widely used — but the vehicles are now available in more than 60 cities nationwide and about a half dozen locations outside of the U.S.”There are thousands of riders now using these scooters, so it’s more important than ever to understand their impact on public health,” said Dr. Tarak Trivedi, the study’s lead author, an emergency physician and scholar in the National Clinician Scholars Program at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The research, published Jan. 25 in JAMA Network Open, is the first published study on injuries caused by electric scooters. It reports that the most common mechanisms of injury among scooter riders were falls (80 percent), collisions with objects (11 percent), or being struck by a moving vehicle such as a car, bicycle or other scooter (9 percent).Among the other findings: About 92 percent (228) of the injured people were riders, and 8 percent (21) were non-riders, including pedestrians who were struck by scooter riders or who stumbled over a discarded scooter. About 4 percent (10) were documented to be wearing a protective helmet while riding their e-scooter. About 5 percent of patients had either a blood alcohol content greater than 0.05 percent or were perceived by physicians to be intoxicated. (In California, a person with blood alcohol content of 0.08 percent is considered to be driving under the influence.) Patients fell into one of three injury categories: head injuries (40 percent), fractures (32 percent) and cuts, sprains or bruises without a fracture or head injury (28 percent). Fifteen people were admitted to the hospital, two of whom were treated in an intensive care unit.center_img The researchers also observed e-scooter riders at various Los Angeles intersections for a total of seven hours in September 2018. About 94 percent of the 193 people they saw riding scooters were not wearing helmets.Related StoriesTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchE-scooters can reach speeds of about 15 miles per hour, and it has become common to see them zipping along streets and sidewalks — even though they are intended to be used on streets only — often dodging pedestrians and motorists. Unused scooters are frequently left at the edge of curbs, but they sometimes are abandoned in places where they obstruct sidewalks or block building entrances.Cities have adopted a hodgepodge of responses to the safety issues posed by the new phenomenon. For example, in August 2018, Santa Monica began a public safety campaign with Bird and Lime, two of the leading e-scooter suppliers. A month later, the city launched a pilot program intended to develop administrative regulations on shared scooters and bikes. (Santa Monica already has a longstanding rule prohibiting bikes and electric devices from sidewalks.)Scooter companies typically recommend that riders be at least 18 years old and wear helmets, although riders often flout those guidelines. And in January 2019, a new California law eliminated the helmet requirement for e-scooter riders 18 and older.The authors noted some limitations of the study. The researchers were limited to the data available in electronic medical records, so information on certain variables — like whether riders were wearing helmets at the time of their injuries — was not always available. They excluded data on 74 emergency department visits that were suspected to be scooter-related but lacked sufficient documentation. They also could not evaluate the role that urban planning and infrastructure might play, for example the influences of speed limits and the availability of dedicated bicycle lanes.The authors wrote that the Segway, a two-wheeled personal transporter that was introduced in the early 2000s, and a precursor of the scooters, also carried a serious risk for orthopedic and neurologic injuries.”We noted similar patterns of injury with the new standing electric scooters,” said Dr. Joann Elmore, professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine and health services research at the Geffen School of Medicine, and the study’s senior author. “But unlike Segway transporters, standing electric scooters will have a substantial impact on public health given their low cost, popularity and broad accessibility.”last_img read more

UTA professor awarded 288 million for novel research on Lou Gehrigs disease

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 21 2019There are 15 new cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, diagnosed in the U.S. each day. The disease causes patients to slowly lose the ability to speak, eat, move and breathe, and comes with an average life expectancy of two to five years after diagnosis.Jingsong Zhou, professor of kinesiology at The University of Texas at Arlington, believes this debilitating disease requires a novel approach.The majority of research on ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, focuses on the spinal cord because of how the disease affects neurological function. But Zhou is investigating the theory that ALS affects the physiology of the whole body through defective cells in multiple organs. Twelve years ago, my lab made a discovery in the muscle defects of ALS, and we have been looking closely at the disease ever since. In the beginning, we believed the muscle atrophy ALS causes was secondary to the death of the neurons in the spinal cord, but we have evidence that indicates the muscle is not only a victim of the disease, rather it actively contributes to it. This is a systemic disorder affecting the whole body.”Jingsong Zhou, professor of kinesiology at The University of Texas at Arlington A respected leader in her field, Zhou has published more than 70 peer-reviewed articles and received more than $4 million in grants in the last decade. She recently received a $2.88 million award from the National Institutes of Health and was invited to serve as a member of the NIH Center for Scientific Review’s Skeletal Muscle and Exercise Physiology Study Section.The NIH grant supports Zhou’s work to preserve mitochondria as it functions or dysfunctions in a diseased cell–part of her pursuit to understand the mechanisms behind why multiple organs are involved in ALS deterioration.”We are ultimately working to find some potential therapeutic means to treat the disease with a new understanding,” Zhou said. “Once we understand why the cells are damaged, we can test potential compounds or therapies.”The NIH-funded study is the continuation of a project Zhou started with funding from the ALS Association. Zhou’s was one of 58 labs selected to receive grants funded by donations raised in 2014 through the viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTSince Zhou began her work on ALS, she has heard countless stories of how the disease has impacted patients and their families. These personal stories, she says, motivate her to keep going.Paul Fadel, CONHI’s associate dean for research, said Zhou’s expertise fortifies the College’s reputation as an innovative center for research and advances UTA’s pursuit of being a leader in serving health and the human condition.”Dr. Zhou’s research explores new territories in an effort to bring relief to ALS patients and their families,” Fadel said. “Her work is groundbreaking, and she plays an essential role in the growth and leadership of the Bone-Muscle Research Center. She is a renowned expert in the field and an enthusiastic collaborator that strengthens our faculty and student experience. We are fortunate to have Dr. Zhou on our team at UTA.”Zhou came to UTA in July 2018 as associate director of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s Bone-Muscle Research Center. Zhou said she was attracted to UTA because of the opportunity for collaborative research the new Science & Engineering Innovation & Research Building provides.”I was looking for a big stage, a big scientific environment, and that’s what UTA offered,” Zhou said. “The SEIR Building and collaboration through our Bone-Muscle Research Center helps us be more competitive for funding. That allows us to do better science, make a stronger impact on the research field and provide significant benefits for our society.”Zhou’s work in examining mitochondria in diseased cells in cases of ALS has translated to other areas of medical research. In February, she was awarded a $610,000 grant from the NIH to apply the concept to the heart muscle in cases of cardiovascular disease.”When you look at cells through a microscope, it’s the same as looking through a telescope at the universe–the discoveries are infinite,” she said. “It’s extremely important to take our time to explore and understand as many elements of the disease as possible so we can fight it efficiently.” Source:University of Texas at Arlingtonlast_img read more

Premier League launches rights auction as tech giants wait

The English Premier League launches its latest auction of domestic live broadcast rights © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Bids for 200 games a season, between 2019 and 2022, must be in between 0800 GMT and 1000 GMT and if any are left unsold there will be further rounds of bidding next week, with a result expected on Tuesday.The 200 games, up from 168 games a season under the current three-year deal, are broken up into seven packages, designed to appeal to different buyers.Sky and BT paid more than £5 billion for the rights in 2016-19, matching the 70 per cent uplift recorded for the previous cycle and are expected to take the lion’s share of the games in the new deal. But the chance of another huge hike in domestic broadcast revenue appears unlikely because the two companies did a deal in December to sell their channels on each other’s platforms.In a bid to draw other players into the market, the Premier League is offering 32 extra games a season and experimenting with new slots and offerings.One of the new packages offers 24 games at 2:00 pm on Sundays and eight games at 7.45 pm on Saturdays. There are two packages that offer two entire rounds of games, simultaneously, on midweek evenings and a bank holiday.Amazon, FacebookBT is understood to be interested in the “simulcast” idea, which is also designed to draw in one or more digital hosts such as Amazon, Facebook, Google or Netflix.None of those companies have confirmed or denied if they are interested in the Premier League’s UK rights but there is increasing speculation they will become major players in the battle for premium international sports content.Kieran Maguire, a football finance expert at the University of Liverpool, told Britain’s Press Association that he does not believe the tech giants are yet ready to enter the market.”That is just the Premier League talking up auction prices,” said Maguire.”It makes no sense for them to bid domestically as the UK is insignificant when looking at global strategy. There is some potential in overseas markets but there is still an issue of monetising subscribers—even Netflix hasn’t quite managed that yet.”Roger Bell of the financial analysis firm Vysyble agreed with Maguire and said the domestic market appeared to have “reached maturity”.”Sky’s economic performance has been challenged by the gravity of the current deal. With a more open relationship between Sky and BT we don’t expect to see the previous hikes of 70 per cent.”However, the expected slowdown domestically does not signal the end of bumper pay days for the Premier League, with deals with Chinese and US broadcasters showing a significant uplift in recent years.Manchester United executive vice chairman Ed Woodward was optimistic about the potential for international growth in his quarterly call on Thursday to announce the club’s financial results.”A word on broadcasting, reports of the death of live sport are greatly exaggerated,” said Woodward.”I just came from a Premier League meeting, where research shows that the league’s global cumulative audience has increased nine per cent year-by-year, with particularly strong increases in Asia and North America.” Facebook to livestream Champions League football games Citation: Premier League launches rights auction as tech giants wait (2018, February 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-premier-league-rights-auction-tech.html The Premier League launches its latest auction of domestic live broadcast rights on Friday but football finance experts say global tech giants such as Amazon and Facebook are not yet ready to enter the fray. read more

Quebec wary of bitcoin gold rush

© 2018 AFP At the site of a former cocoa factory in Canada’s Quebec province, tiny holes punctured in the walls of a warehouse allow fresh air to cool thousands of whirring processors connected by a tangle of wires. A technician inspects the backside of bitcoin mining at Bitfarms in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “Most of the business requests that we had in our region to open computer warehouses to mine cryptocurrencies would result in very little job creation,” said the town administrator, Robert Desmarais.Marc-Antoine Pouliot, a Hydro-Quebec spokesman, added: “We can’t predict the future for this industry.” Two technicians look at bitcoin mining at Bitfarms in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec Yessoulou Coulibaly watches over the sea of 7,000-odd computers hidden away in this industrial park at a center operated by Bitfarms, one of the emerging players of the cryptocurrency “mining” boom.Unlike the dollar or the euro, cryptocurrencies are not issued by central banks. Instead they are “mined” or created thanks to server “farms” like the one in the Montreal suburb of Saint-Hyacinthe—which crack increasingly complex computer codes in order to unlock new batches, or blocks of virtual coins.Mining on a large scale requires massive computing power, which in turn requires a lot of electric power.That is where Quebec comes in the picture: luring miners with its plentiful, cheap electricity and below average temperatures—akin to Iceland, where a sister cryptocurrency blitz is also underway.Coulibaly is among a wave of entrepreneurs flooding the province, in a bid to transform it into a Silicon Valley for the emerging sector.But some authorities are leery, fearing a surge of demand for electric power could trigger blackouts, for the benefit of an industry that few fully understand. In March, a number of Quebec municipalities slapped moratoriums on new cryptocurrency factories while the province’s government and the Hydro-Quebec public utility have halted new projects to get a better grasp of the technology and its broader economic impact.The first to put on the brakes was the tiny municipality of Bromont, east of Montreal, where a new bitcoin operation was seeking to consume 30 of the town’s 36 megawatts of total available excess power.Soon after, the neighboring township of Brome-Missisquoi imposed a similar ban on new bitcoin mines. “It’s like a traditional mining company that digs up gold and sells it, but 2.0,” he said of his company, which channels computing power to mine bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies.The internet entrepreneur made his fortune starting a web hosting and cloud services business at age 14. Now in his 40s, he says blockchain—the name given to the shared public database where all bitcoin transactions are recorded—is “a new technology that can be compared to the internet” in terms of “revolutionary” potential.Quimper started Bitfarms last year after first mining bitcoin at home and is confident in his investment.”I did not miss the boat for the internet; I do not want to miss the boat for blockchain,” said the entrepreneur, who is convinced the technology will have applications for other industries including banking, aviation and transport.Today, the Quebec company claims to be the North American leader in cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology, and is listed on the New York and Tel Aviv stock exchanges.In its first two months of operation in November and December, Bitfarms earned $4.9 million selling virtual currency coined at the Saint-Hyacinthe and three other mines in Quebec.The company already uses 27.5 megawatts to power 19,000 computers, and is aiming to boost its usage to 100 megawatts by the end of this year.”If electricity prices spike, however, we will look elsewhere,” said Quimper, pointing to the abundant power sources also available in the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Manitoba. Authorities, he explained, “want to see first how projects can be established in Quebec in a sustainable manner,” without ruling out a hike in electricity rates.According to Pouliot, the dash began in September after China moved to regulate cryptocurrency trading.Quebec has received proposals for projects that would use more than 9,000 megawatts combined, out of Hydro-Quebec’s total 40,000-megawatt capacity—equal to the power consumed by 83 percent of Quebec households.Most of the interest in relocating to the province has so far come from China, according to Pouliot. Russian investors have also shown interest, say organizers of the first international blockchain summit to be held in Montreal in April.In Quebec, “electricity is affordable, abundant and green,” Pouliot said, noting massive hydroelectric dams in the north generate most of the power. The cool weather also means factories require less air conditioning.Add those factors to bitcoin’s soaring valuation—which peaked at $20,000 in December, before falling to less than half that —and Canada has itself a modern-day gold mine, even as some critics warn the virtual currency boom could amount to a bubble, or even a Ponzi scheme.Blockchain ‘revolution’Bitfarms president Pierre-Luc Quimper said his startup already employs 90 people. Explore further Citation: Quebec wary of bitcoin gold rush (2018, April 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-quebec-wary-bitcoin-gold.html Bitcoin and cryptocurrency for n00bs Bitcoin is the first decentralized digital currency, as the system works based on the blockchain technology without a central bank or single administrator read more

Review Motorola Moto G7 is the inexpensive Android phone youve been waiting

first_imgThe Motorola Moto G7 ©2019 The Dallas Morning News Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Review: Motorola Moto G7 is the inexpensive Android phone you’ve been waiting for (2019, May 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-motorola-moto-g7-inexpensive-android.html My current choice is the iPhone XS Max.Apple has released several iPhone models in each of the last few years, but none of them were what I would call inexpensive. If I wanted to find a cheap iPhone, I’d look for a used one.Android users have their share of expensive phones, but they also are blessed with some great choices that are really affordable.I’ve been trying out the Motorola Moto G7, which packs a lot of nice features inside a handset that costs just $299.99.The G7 looks great with its edge-to-edge 6.2-inch LCD with an aspect ratio of 19:9 and a resolution of 2,270 x 1,080 pixels.The front and back are made of glass. The phone is water-repellent, but I wouldn’t count on taking it swimming.Motorola moved the fingerprint sensor to the back, under the cameras, which is perfect for my hands. The fingerprints are easy to register, and the phone unlocks very quickly with just a touch on the sensor.The G7 is almost as big as my iPhone XS Max, but it has a slightly bigger bezel at the bottom of the screen where Motorola has placed its logo.It measures 6.18 by 2.96 by 0.31 inches and weighs 6.06 ounces.It syncs and charges with a USB-C port that transfers data at USB 2.0 speeds. The G7 also has a headphone jack.It comes with 64 gigabytes of onboard storage and has a microSD card slot for additional storage.The G7 is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 632 1.8 GHz octa-core CPU with 4 gigabytes of RAM and an Adreno 506 graphics processor.The phone ships with Android 9 (Pie).There are two cameras on the back of the G7. The main camera has a 12-megapixel sensor with an f/1.8 lens, and the secondary camera has a 5-megapixel sensor that’s only used to provide depth information for portrait mode.The main camera can shoot 4K video.The front camera has an 8-megapixel sensor.The cameras do a good job, especially in good light, but you won’t get the same quality as you might with the cameras in a phone that costs $1,000 or more.Gestures countThere are a few pretty cool gestures that can act as shortcuts on the G7.If you give the phone a quick twist, like you’re turning it over twice in a row, the camera app will launch.If you shake the phone like you’re giving a karate chop, it’ll turn on the flashlight.The G7 also has a One Button Nav mode that replaces the three onscreen buttons at the bottom with one button that acts like all three with the swipe of a finger.The G7 has a 3,000 mAh battery with 15 watt TurboPower charging that’ll give nine hours of phone use with just 15 minutes of charging. The faster charger is included in the box.TradeoffsThere are a lot of nice features on the G7, but when you pay one-third the cost of an Apple or Samsung flagship phone, you’ll notice some missing features.There is no wireless charging or NFC chip.The lack of NFC means you can’t use the handset to pay for things with Google Pay.And, as I mentioned above, the camera is good but not great.Users will also find the G7 is not be the best choice for graphics-intensive games.But overall, the G7 feels like a more expensive phone.It looks great, responds quickly enough for everyday app use and it has a nice, big screen.I also love the microSD card slot.Not being able to pay for things with the phone is a bummer, but if that feature isn’t important to you, I can certainly recommend the G7.I know plenty of users who look for affordability over features. The G7 is a the best inexpensive Android phone you can buy right now.Pros: Inexpensive. Great screen. Expandable storage.Cons: Single speaker. Photo quality suffers in low light. No wireless charging.Bottom line: The G7 is the best phone for less than $500.center_img Explore further I’m a tech reviewer, so I think people expect me to carry the newest iPhone—at least that’s what I tell my wife. Review: Moto G5 Plus: An inexpensive Android phone with all the right featureslast_img read more

Making the humanbody internet more effective

first_imgExperiment setup to understand how characteristics of human body communication can be improved. Credit: Dairoku Muramatsu & Yoshifumi Nishida, Source: Equivalent Circuit Model Viewed from Receiver Side in Human Body Communication How wireless recharging works – and doesn’t, yet Explore further HBC is safer because it uses a lower-frequency signal that is sharply attenuated depending on the distance. The closed nature of the transmission results in lower interference and higher reliability, and therefore, more secure connections. Having the device interact directly with the body also means that it has reliable biomedical applications.HBC technologies use electrodes instead of antennas to couple signals to the human body. This can be used to conduct an electric field from a transmitter to a receiver, and thus to communicate data. HBC receivers work very similarly to radio frequency receivers; however, it’s much more difficult to determine their input impedance. This is important because this allows scientists to maximize the received signal power.The most important factors are the arrangement of electrodes and the distance between the transmitter and the receiver. These affect the output impedance and the equivalent source voltage of the system, ultimately having an impact on the received signal power. The signal emanates from the transmitter electrode and goes through the body. The body’s conductivity couples the field to the environment and this serves as the return path for the transmitted signal.In their study, the team of Japanese scientists—Dr. Dairoku Muramatsu (Tokyo University of Science), Mr. Yoshifumi Nishida, Prof Ken Sasaki, Mr. Kentaro Yamamoto (all from the University of Tokyo), and Prof Fukuro Koshiji (Tokyo Polytechnic University)—sought to analyze these characteristics by constructing an equivalent circuit model of the signal transmission that goes from the body to an off-body receiver through touch.The signal electrodes of both the transmitter and the receiver, as well as the ground electrode of the transmitter, were attached to the body. The ground electrode of the receiver was left “floating” in air. This was unlike other contemporary HBC configurations, in which both ground electrodes are left floating in air. The researchers found that impedance increases with increasing distance between the transmitter electrodes. Interestingly, they also found that the size of the receiver ground was another factor that affected transmission. They report that capacitive coupling between receiver ground and human body increases as the former gets larger.The findings of this study are important, as they enable scientists to design more efficient HBC devices, which are better tuned to the human electric field and, hopefully, better suited for user interaction.Keyboards, screens, switches and wires dominate the way people communicate, and the basics of user interfaces, or “soft ergonomics,” have hardly changed in the last few decades. People still sit behind desks for hours and stare at monitors. Connectivity is very dependent on wireless signals, and thus, the open nature of these networks makes data vulnerable to hacker attacks.By using the human body itself as a network, HBC could potentially change this.As Dr. Muramatsu and Mr. Nishida put it, “Because the electric field used in HBC has the property of being sharply attenuated with respect to distance, it hardly leaks to the surrounding space during signal transmission. Thus, using this human body communication model makes it possible to communicate with excellent confidentiality and without generating electromagnetic noise. However, one major drawback of HBC is that it cannot be used for high-speed data communication. Thus, the focus should be on applications of HBC that transmit relatively low-capacity data, such as authentication information and biomedical signals, for long periods with low power consumption.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Making the ‘human-body internet’ more effective (2019, June 14) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-human-body-internet-effective.html Provided by Tokyo University of Science More information: Yoshifumi Nishida et al, Equivalent Circuit Model Viewed from Receiver Side in Human Body Communication, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems (2019). DOI: 10.1109/TBCAS.2019.2918323 Wireless technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have made remote connectivity easier, and as electronics become smaller and faster, the adoption of “wearables” has increased. From smart watches to implantables, such devices interact with the human body in ways that are very different from those of a computer. However, they both use the same protocols to transfer information, making them vulnerable to the same security risks. Thus, researchers consider using the human body itself to transfer and collect information. This area of research is known as human body communication (HBC). Now, scientists from Japan report HBC characteristics specific to impedance and electrodes, which they say “have the potential to improve the design and working of devices based on HBC.”last_img read more

Tiny Fighting Worms Make One of the Loudest Sounds in the Ocean

first_img Strange Love: 10 Animals with Truly Weird Courtship Rituals Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoInfinityKloudHow To Backup All Your Files In Seconds.InfinityKloudUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65945-tiny-worms-emit-loud-noise.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭 Tiny, feisty worms that live off the coast of Japan fight by headbutting each other — and they aren’t quiet about it. During these feuds, the worms emit one of the loudest sounds in the ocean, according to a new study. The source of the underwater hullabaloo is a nearly transparent segmented worm called the Leocratides kimuraorum, which lives inside sponges 279 to 554 feet (85 to 169 meters) deep off the coast of Japan. [The 12 Weirdest Animal Discoveries] These wigglies are just a tad more than an inch (29 millimeters) long and have lengthy tentacles and a big mouth (literally). These seemingly quiet creatures revealed their true nature under the spotlight in the lab. A group of researchers used an instrument called a hydrophone to record 15 pops that were emitted from three kimuraorums as they were fighting. In a marine feud researchers dub “mouth-fighting,” the worms approached each other headfirst with their mouths open. During such encounters, the worms’ pharynx muscles expand rapidly, creating a cavitation bubble that collapses and produces a loud “pop” while the worms launch into each other. The researchers found that these pops can reach 157 decibels in the water (which is a different measurement than decibels in the air). From right next to the water tank, the pops sounded like humans snapping their fingers, lead author Goto Ryutaro, an assitant professor at Kyoto University told Live Science. “Though they probably sound louder if you hear them in the water.” The worms are as loud as snapping shrimps, which are one of the biggest noisemakers in the ocean, the authors wrote. What’s more, they found that these worms did not make any noise when simply disturbed, they only did so when they were fighting. They “may use mouth-fighting to defend territory or living chambers from other worms,” the authors wrote July 8 in the journal Current Biology. “A loud pop may be a byproduct of the rapid mouth attack, but it may also aid intraspecific communication.” A loud noise could somehow determine the victor of the fight or even reveal the whereabouts of nearby worms, they wrote. 13 Extremely Weird Animal Feet The 10 Strangest Animal Discoverieslast_img read more

Vadodara to host 8th international marathon Jan 6

first_img Vadodara is all geared up to host the eighth international marathon on Sunday. Over one lakh participants have registered themselves for the event that will be flagged off by Chief Minister Vijay Rupani. “Around 1,02,000 participants have registered themselves for this mega event compared to 2018’s total of 92,000 participants,” Tejal Amin, Chairperson, Vadodara International Marathon (VIM), said Saturday. The marathon will be held across four categories: 42 km, 21 km, 10 km and 5 km. Other categories include “divyang paralympic run”,.“swachhata run”, “pledge run” and “jawan run“. “Accredited to the Association of International Marathon and Distance Races, the Vadodara Marathon is the recipient of the AIMS gold medal for the ‘smallest city, biggest Marathon’,” said Amin. Amin said a special machine has been brought in for shredding plastic generated after tomorrow’s run. “It will be recycled and reused as polyester yarn,” she said.Among other attractions, Oman’s Haitham Rafi will sing .“Vaishnav jan to….”, the favourite bhajan of Mahatma Gandhi, when the event will be flagged off. Published on Gujarat SHARE January 05, 2019 COMMENTcenter_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL sport athletics COMMENTSlast_img read more

Jind bypoll BJPs Krishan Middha wins by a margin of 12000 votes

first_imgregional elections SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS BJP’s Krishan Middha defeats nearest rival Digvijay Singh Chautala of Jannayak Janata Party by 12,935 votes, an official.Counting of votes for the bypoll began here on Thursday amid tight security arrangements.Twenty-one candidates, including two women, had contested the bypoll, which were held on January 28. A healthy voter turnout of 75.77 per cent was reported in the by-election to the Jind assembly constituency, dubbed as a prestige battle for the ruling BJP, the Congress and the Indian National Lok Dal (INLD) ahead of the parliamentary and assembly polls.The bypoll is also important for the newly-floated Jannayak Janata Party (JJP), which was formed after a split in the main opposition INLD.The by-election was necessitated following the death of INLD MLA Hari Chan Middha, whose son Krishan Middha recently joined the BJP and contested as the saffron party’s candidate for the bypoll.Hari Chand Middha had represented Jind twice.The Congress fielded its senior leader and sitting MLA from Kaithal constituency Randeep Singh Surjewala. The INLD banked on Umed Singh Redhu to retain the seat.The JJP put its weight behind Digvijay Singh Chautala, the younger son of jailed leader Ajay Singh Chautala, who broke away from the INLD and floated the party last month.Loktantra Suraksha Party (LSP), which is led by BJP’s rebel MP Raj Kumar Saini, had also entered the fray and fielded its candidate.The bypoll was held just months ahead of the Lok Sabha and assembly elections in Haryana making it even more important. Arch rivals BJP, Congress, INLD and JJP are eyeing the results as a self-assessment exercise ahead of Lok Sabha polls this year.The high-stake election is considered a referendum on the Manohar Lal Khattar government and also a semi-final ahead of Lok Sabha elections. Haryana Manohar Lal Khattar, CM of Haryana (file photo)center_img Published on COMMENT January 31, 2019 SHARElast_img read more

Watchmakers sixth boutique opens in PJ

first_img CELEBRATING its sixth and latest boutique in Malaysia is renowned Swiss watchmaker TAG Heuer.The new boutique located on the ground floor of 1 Utama shopping centre, Petaling Jaya is its third in Malaysia to feature the new global design concept. South-East Asia and Australia TAG Heuer managing director Amelia Sillard said the company was always looking out for new locations to open boutiques.“As our brand continues to grow in Malaysia, we hope to share this unique experience with our customers across the country. Related News Business News 11 Jul 2019 i-Stone IPO oversubscribed 11.56 times Tags / Keywords: Central Region , On the watch “Nestled in the heart of the city, this complex is one of the most popular shopping destinations in Klang Valley,” she said.At the opening ceremony, Sillard was joined by Bandar Utama City Centre Sdn Bhd director Tan Sri Teo Chiang Kok and TAG Heuer Malaysia retail manager Geetha Rengarajoo for a ribbon-cutting ceremony.The boutique carries an extensive range of novelties, including the new TAG Heuer Carrera Lady and special editions which were on display during the event alongside heritage pieces.The iconic Monaco timepiece, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, was also in the spotlight at the launch.Five limited editions will be successively revealed throughout the year in honour of the anniversary.Paying tribute to contemporary style, these new models are inspired by the different decades from 1969 to 2019. {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Football 09 Jul 2019 Leicester sign midfielder Tielemans from Monaco Metro News 19 Apr 2019 Celebrating an iconic timepiece “One major factor which drove our decision to open a boutique in 1 Utama is the footfall the complex attracts. The new TAG Heuer boutique at 1 Utama shopping centre in Petaling Jaya. Sillard (right) showing Teo some of the novelty pieces available at the newly opened TAG Heuer boutique. Related Newslast_img read more

After scuffles Hong Kong police warn protesters to refrain from violence leave

first_img Related News Related News HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong police appealed to protesters on Saturday to refrain from violence and leave the area after scuffles in the town of Sheung Shui, where thousands of demonstrators had converged earlier in the day to protest against mainland Chinese traders. World 07 Jul 2019 Hong Kong protesters march again, reaching out to Chinese visitors World 08 Jul 2019 Hong Kong police arrest six at Kowloon protestcenter_img The police made the announcement in a post on their website and in a message read out on television.The protest in Sheung Shui, not far from the Chinese city of Shenzhen, started peacefully but devolved into skirmishes, with demonstrators throwing umbrellas and hard hats at police who retaliated by swinging batons and firing pepper spray. (Reporting by John Ruwitch; Editing by Mark Heinrich) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} World 11 Jul 2019 China’s top official in Hong Kong says Beijing backs city’s leaderlast_img read more

Liverpools transfer window will not be biggest Klopp

first_img“Brewster, Oxlade-Chamberlain didn’t play last year. All the young boys today … they’re all new players for us.”Liverpool signed 17-year-old defender Sepp van den Berg from Dutch top division side PEC Zwolle last month while Danny Ings, Daniel Sturridge and Alberto Moreno have left the club.”The transfer market is open until Aug. 8 … we will see what we do but I don’t think it will be the biggest transfer window of all time,” Klopp added.Klopp reserved special praise for Brewster following the match at Prenton Park, saying the youngster had an important role in the new campaign which kicks off with a home match against promoted Norwich City on Aug. 9.”Rhian Brewster is a top striker … I’m really happy. He has an important role this year, but how important? It depends on him and we’ll see,” the German added.”He has to play different positions because the centre is OK, wing is possible, and then we will see how we can line up. There will be opportunities for him, I’m really sure.” (Reporting by Shrivathsa Sridhar in Bengaluru; editing by Sudipto Ganguly) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Football 03 May 2019 Klopp convinced Liverpool will put Barca defeat out of mind (Reuters) – Liverpool will not have a busy transfer window ahead of the new Premier League season, with fit-again Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and teenager Rhian Brewster set to compete for starting places, manager Juergen Klopp has said.Midfielder Oxlade-Chamberlain played only two matches last season due to a serious knee injury as Liverpool finished second behind Manchester City in the league but went on to win the Champions League by defeating Tottenham Hotspur in the final.Brewster is yet to make his competitive debut but the 19-year-old reminded Klopp of his abilities with a brace in a 6-0 pre-season friendly win at Tranmere Rovers on Thursday.”We brought them in already, only you don’t realise it,” Klopp told reporters when asked about potential signings. Football 28 Apr 2019 Sterling finally getting recognition he deserves – Oxlade-Chamberlaincenter_img Related News Related News Say What 03 Jul 2019 Not in the Red – Liverpool should invest further to add more creativitylast_img read more

Rahul Gandhi granted bail in Ahmedabad bank defamation case on Rs 15000

first_img Next India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 17:43 IST Rahul Gandhi comes out of the court after the defamation case hearing. (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSRahul Gandhi has been granted bail on a bond of Rs 15,000Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank had filed a criminal defamation suit against GandhiAmit Shah is one of the directors of the cooperative bankRahul Gandhi has been granted bail in the criminal defamation suit filed against him by Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank and its chairman Ajay Patel.During the hearing, when the metropolitan court judge asked him if he accepts his crime, Rahul Gandhi said, “I am not a criminal.”Rahul Gandhi was present for the defamation case hearing at the Ahmedabad Metropolitan Court.The court granted Rahul Gandhi bail on a bond of Rs 15,000.The defamation suit was filed last year after Gandhi and Congress spokesperson Randeep Singh Surjewala claimed that the Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank was involved in a “scam” to swap Rs 745.59 crore in swapped notes with valid currency within five days of demonetisation announcement on November 8, 2016.Union home minister Amit Shah is one of the directors of the ADC Bank.The court issued summonses to the two leaders on April 9 after finding prima facie evidence against them.The complainants said that the Congress leaders levelled “false and defamatory allegations” against the bank.The court had conducted an inquiry under section 202 of the Code of Criminal Procedure before summoning Gandhi and Surjewala.The section deals with inquiry to decide whether there is sufficient ground for proceeding against a person.Gandhi and Surjewala’s allegations were based on the reply given by the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development to an RTI query of a Mumbai-based activist.ADCB and Patel have denied that the bank exchanged such a huge amount of swapped currency as alleged.(With PTI inputs)Also Read | Have not demanded front-row seat for Rahul Gandhi in Parliament: CongressAlso Watch | Is Rahul Gandhi’s strategy now to demonise RSS and play martyr?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjee Rahul Gandhi granted bail in Ahmedabad bank defamation case on Rs 15,000 bondRahul Gandhi has been granted bail in the criminal defamation case filed by an Ahmedabad bank.advertisementlast_img read more

SC issues notice on plea seeking quashing of Prem Singh Tamangs appointment

first_imgSC issues notice on plea seeking quashing of Prem Singh Tamang’s appointment as Sikkim CMThe apex court has also sought responses from the parties on a plea seeking stay on Tamang taking any major policy decision or other important governance duties as the state’s chief minister.advertisement Next Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 23:37 IST The petition by Bimal Dawari Sharma alleges Tamang was a “disqualified” person who is ineligible to contest elections till 2024 | Photo: Facebook/ @ps.golayThe Supreme Court Friday sought responses from the Centre and the Sikkim government on a plea seeking quashing of appointment of Prem Singh Tamang as the chief minister of the Himalayan state on the ground that he was not qualified to hold the office as he was convicted for misappropriation of funds as a public servant in the past.A bench headed by Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi also issued notice to Tamang, who was recently elected as chief minister, on the contention that as per the election law any person who is convicted under corruption offences shall stand disqualified for a period of six years from the date of his conviction.The apex court has also sought responses from the parties on a plea seeking stay on Tamang taking any major policy decision or other important governance duties as the state’s chief minister.The petition by Bimal Dawari Sharma of the ousted Sikkim Democratic Front Party, which ruled the state for 25 years, alleges that Tamang was a “disqualified” person who is ineligible to contest elections till 2024.The petition, which has been settled by senior advocate G V Rao, said, “Tamang has not only been allowed to contest the elections, but he has also been wrongfully elected as the Chief Minister of Sikkim despite being a disqualified and ineligible for contesting in the elections and is thereby bad in law.”The plea alleged that Tamang was held guilty of misappropriating Rs 9,50,000 while he was the minister of animal husbandry and ecclesiastical department with regard to irregularities in purchase and distribution of milch cows.Tamang who was held guilty of offences for criminal breach of trust, criminal conspiracy and “gross abuse” of his position as a public servant had also served one year imprisonment between 2017 and 2018, the plea said.”It is clear that the RPA lays down that the commission of serious criminal offences renders a person ineligible to contest in elections or continue as a representative of the people. Such a restriction does provide the salutary deterrent necessary to prevent criminal elements from holding public office thereby preserving the probity of representative government,” the petition said..The plea said that appointment of Tamang as Sikkim’s chief minister was “unconstitutional” and “violates the fundamental core of the Constitution”.”The appointment of Tamang as the Chief Minister of the State of Sikkim is in conflict with the interest of the nation, common citizenry interest, communal harmony, and prevalence of good governance,” the plea said.Also Read | Floods affect 8 lakh in Assam, 10 dead across Northeast as rains lash region | 10 pointsAlso Read | Sikkim remains cut-off for 2nd day as multiple landslides block NH-31Also Watch | North Sikkim: China strengthens infrastructure across borders as temperature hits minus 20 degrees CFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow Supreme CourtFollow TamangFollow Sikkimlast_img read more